CLONAKILTY SHOW ON SUNDAY, 11th JUNE – GREAT AFFORDABLE FAMILY DAY OUT

Welcome to this year’s Clonakilty Agricultural Show.  It’s all happening on Sunday, 11th June and takes place in the Show Grounds Clonakilty, just a short distance from the Award Winning Town of Clonakilty. This huge event has been attracting thousands of people yearly from far and wide with its mixture of agricultural events, concerts and special emphasis on an affordable family day out – all set against the beautiful backdrop of the rugged countryside and the Atlantic Ocean

New to this year’s show is the six-time Irish trial-bike champion Andy Perry and his “trialstar” team display their skills and bravery riding motorcycles over jumps and a few mind-boggling obstacles. Andy has previously performed in Red Bull events and numerous shows around the country and we’re really looking forward to seeing his team at this year’s Clonakilty Agricultural Show.

The Tug O’War event is back where teams of 6-aside with a maximum weight of 720 and 520kg. Weigh in will be at 12.00 Noon – 12.45pm and pulling will commence at 1.00 pm.

Every year Clonakilty Show try to make the day as affordable as possible for young families with some free entertainment and this year is no exception.  Clonakilty Agricultural Show are delighted to announce a very special theatre performance from Wexford Studio and Athenaeum Theatre and Museum in Enniscorthy and the interesting storyline may have a lesson for all of us.  The name of the show is “Jeff and Elvis”  and is a wonderful celebration of storytelling.  This exciting production is packed full of adventure and fun, uses songs, puppets, masks, and comedy to tell the story of how a bully changes his ways and finds happiness through love and friendship.  The show lasts for one hour, in a special theatre tent, which is very attractive in itself  and can accommodate up to 40 per show.  Well worth catching up with at Clonakilty Agricultural Show on Sunday, 11th June..

Show day is about animals and the show grounds will be turned into a mini wonderland with frisky calves paraded on their first day out at the show.  Foals as young as two weeks old can be admired while fully grown horses will be there in all their glory, groomed with manes and tails plaited.

Gerard’s Mobile Farm will allow young people to get up close to farm animals.  With farming getting so commercialised, even country kids do not get up close to animals, so this is an opportunity to give a lamb or a calf or a goat and all the bunny rabbits a big hug.  Contact with animals provides a wealth of experience and if we learn to care for our animals, we will be better placed to care for each other.

Dogs are always a treat to see and the dog show is one of the most popular attractions every year with classes open to all canines – mutt and pedigree.  Breeds from sheepdogs to St Bernard will be on show.  The judge is all the way from Tipperary.  Entries for the Dog Show will be taken by the Ring Side from 1.00pm onwards.

Clonakilty Show is recognised as one of the top shows in the country, its cornerstone has always been the exhibiting of the finest animals and bringing out the best of breeds, be it horses or ponies, cattle or sheep and of late the return of poultry.

The provision of good healthy food has always been central to farming and fishing.  Clonakilty Agricultural Show are delighted to announce that their show on Sunday, 11th June 2017 will be one of the venues for the live amateur cooking competition “The All Ireland Home Cook Champion “2017.  The Competition which is run in association with the Irish Countrywoman’s Association (ICA).    The Competition tag line is “Creativity with Irish Ingredients”   The competition will be run alongside cooking demonstrations by TV3 and RTE chef Adrian Martin (Chef Adrian). The cooking demonstrations and live cooking competition will take place alongside an artisan food village.

And if that that doesn’t make your hungry, admiring all the superb cakes, breads, preserves, fruit and vegetables for a coveted First Prize will certainly do so in the Domestic Arts Competition under the guidance of Lady President , Eileen O’Leary and the Ladies Committee.  Don’t worry, the food village will be dispensing tasty food all day with stands from Carbery, Irish Yogurts, Clonakilty Black Pudding, Clona Milk, plus many more.

Over the years, Clonakilty Show has come to mean a wonderful and affordable day out for all the family and this year the programme is better than ever. The theme for this year’s show is “Bringing a Bit of Country to Town” and there will be 3½ hours of nonstop music to Paul Kelly and Band.  Making a special appearance is Paddy O’Brien, no stranger to Clonakilty who played many a time in the Industrial Hall.  MC for the Jiving Competition is Michael Whelton from Rosscarbery.  There is also Open Mic Section from 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm to show case new comers to music.

Back in 1913, the show boasted of having one of the top exhibits of fowl in the country.  Of late we have seen the disappearance of fowl from every farm yard in the country but the re-kindle of the spirit of self-proficiency has seen the return of fowl to shows around the country with some rare and common breeds and no doubt this year the exhibition will be larger than ever under the capable hands of Sarah Flynn, Gerard Knowles and Padraig and Darren Keohane.

Fashion conscious ladies and gents will be vying for the title of Best Dressed Lady and Gent,

Not to be missed is the Young People’s Art Competition which is a source of inspiration and shows how talented our young people are and how creative our school and play schools have become. Well done to all the local schools for taking part and to their teachers for encouraging the young people.

Rounding off the evening’s entertainment, the best of carriages and training gigs will feature in the Clonakilty Agricultural Show Ride and Drive and the last event of all, the exciting trotting and sulky racing with a 3 card race meeting.

Agricultural shows are part of our heritage, something deep rooted in our hearts and memories.  For some of us, we have the memory of a unique family day out, being taken to the show on the second Wednesday in July as a toddler and young child; it was one of the few family days out in the year, now we bring our own children or grandchildren to continue in the tradition.

Today, more than ever, we cherish those simple, special occasions when we meet old friends, exchange the news, have a chat, and have a wonderful day out.  Clonakilty show is the place to be on Sunday 11TH June, where else would you be.

This is what shows is all about, meeting up with fiends, old friends, neighbours, relatives with a rouged view of the country side and the Atlantic Ocean, full of attraction for young and old, entertainment at an affordable price and at its best.  Family admission a mere €20.

IRISH DRAUGHT CLASSES FOR CLONAKILTY SHOW

IRISH DRAUGHT CLASSES FOR CLONAKILTY SHOW – SUNDAY, 11th JUNE

Irish Draught Classes were never popular at Clonakilty Agricultural Show, but this year the committee have gone all out and increased the number of classes to attract entries in our national horse breed of Ireland.

The Irish Draught which was developed primarily for farm use, had to be able to plough a field, be ridden under saddle, hunt with the hounds and take the family trap to church on a Sunday. The stamina, docility and good sense of the Irish Draught made it ideally suitable to all of these disciplines. Irish Draughts were bred to be economical to keep, surviving on grass and gorse, and on any boiled turnips, oats and bran left over from cattle feed.

The breed originated from the Irish Hobby, a small ambling horse with many similarities to the primitive Garrano and Sorraia horses of Northern Spain and Portugal. War horses brought to Ireland during the Anglo-Norman invasions were bred with this local stock and later, additional Iberian blood was incorporated as Spanish horses from the shipwrecked Armada found their way ashore near Cork and the South West of Ireland.

Clydesdale, Thoroughbred and half-bred sires were used on the local Draught mares in the 19th century and early 20th century, and a sprinkling of native Connemara pony blood added to form the breed known as the Irish Draught today.

The Irish government became involved with the breed at the beginning of the 20th century to promote better horses. They offered subsidies, and introduced registration for stallions in 1907 and mares in 1911. Inspections for registration also began. The stud book was opened by the Ministry of Agriculture in 1917, selecting 375 mares and 44 stallions to enter as the foundation stock.

Clydesdale horses were imported from Britain to meet the demand for plough horses in the heavy soil agricultural areas and also as heavy haulage horses in Dublin and other cities. Clydes were cross-bred with the Irish Draught horses in these areas, producing an animal that was taller and coarser. However, the Clydesdale was blamed for adding a lack of stamina, and poor limb and quarter conformation to the Irish Draught and so this practice was discontinued. Infusions of Thoroughbred blood helped to breed out some of these traits, and also added more refinement, greater endurance, and better shoulder conformation.

The breed flourished for a while, but numbers subsequently dropped as a result of death losses during the Great Wars, and the mechanization of the mid-20th century. During the latter period, thousands of horses went to the slaughterhouse each week as farm horses were sold to pay for tractors.

In 1976, a small group of Irish breeders banded together to form the Irish Draught Horse Society to preserve the breed. By 1979, a branch of the Society was formed in Great Britain. Bord na gCapall (“Irish Horse Board” in Irish) was formed in 1976 specifically to promote the non-Thoroughbred horse industry, but was disbanded in the 1980s. The Irish Horse Board (IHB) was founded as a co-operative society in 1993 and administers the Irish Horse Register, the Irish Sport Horse Studbook and the Irish Draught Horse Studbook on behalf of the Department of Agriculture.

Today, the Irish Draught horse are especially popular for crossing with Thoroughbreds and warmbloods, producing the popular Irish Sport Horses, which excel at the highest levels of eventing and show jumping.

Since the evolution of showjumping in Ireland, Irish Draughts have been popular for crossbreeding. They are well-known for producing upper-level eventers and show jumpers, and are exported across the globe. Today’s Irish Draught is used mainly as a foundation animal for crossing with other breeds to produce sport horses. The most popular cross is the Thoroughbred or Continental Warmblood stallion used on the purebred or partbred Irish Draught mare to produce the Irish Sport Horse (or Irish Draught Sport Horse). The Irish Draught dam passes on bone, substance, and a more sensible temperament to her crossbred offspring. The breed is also used for hunting and showing, being excellent jumpers themselves. Due to its calm good sense and strength, Irish Draught geldings are popular mounts for police forces in Britain and Ireland.

The upsurge in leisure riding as a pastime in recent years has given the Irish Draught, particularly the Irish Draught gelding, a great new outlet. The docile temperament and good sense of the Irish Draught make it the ideal mount for the leisure or casual rider.

The judge on the day of the show will be off the IDHBA Approved List.

2017 CHAMPION BREAD COMPETITION

Have you got the winning Recipe for the 2017 Champion Bread Competition to be baked and judged at Clonakilty Agricultural Show on Sunday, 11th June by Chef Adrian of TV3 and RTE fame.

The judges will be looking for creative, tasty recipes that will work in any kitchen, maybe it has an usual ingredient or different baking style that makes it stand out from all the rest.  The recipe must be original, not copied from a book or website.  It must be family friendly, healthy, easy to make and carry a descriptive name which can come from the ingredients or the recipe’s history.

There will be 3 categories

  1. Soda bread baked in a loaf or round tin
  2. Loaf with a twist (unusual ingredients or different baking styles, etc)
  3. Loaf suitable for someone with a special health conditions i.e. celiac, lactose intolerance or diabetic

While we are led to belief that the traditional soda bread recipe has been around for thousands of years, it comes as a surprise that one of the main ingredients Bicarbonate of Soda was first introduced into Ireland in the 1840s.

Soda bread was made with only the most basic of ingredients flour, baking soda, soured milk and salt.  Before baking, a cross was cut on the top with a knife, to ward off the devil and protect the household.

Back then, potatoes and milk made a nutritious enough meal to exist on and you could grow more potatoes per acre than any other crop, so the soda bread was probably not made as much because of this reason.

In September of 1845 a blight hit the potato crops and while some say that soda bread was invented during the great potato famine this is not true but it did become popular in Ireland at this time, so I am sure the famine spurred it’s popularity.

Bread-making was an integral part of daily life in almost every home. Families lived in isolated farmhouses where most kitchens had only open hearths, so the breads that developed were baked on griddles or in large three-legged black iron pots over fragrant turf fires. This method resulted in a loaf that was tender and dense, with a slight sour tang and a hard   crust.

Today, the tradition still carries on, Irish families continue to bake their own bread daily from specially treasured recipes passed down through the generations.  There are a number of new twists to the main ingredients of flour, baking soda with the introduction of seeds and some other new ingredients available and the established favourite soda bread continues to be treat with tourists and locals alike and is often the topic of conversation for many, following the weather of course..

Entries to include your Recipe, photography if possible, your name, address, contact number and which category you wish to enter your bread – 1, 2 or 3 (as above), to be send to Donal McCarthy, Champion Bread 2017 Competition, Ballinard, Ballineen, Co  Cork or by email to clonakiltyagrishow@gmail.com with subject matter Champion Bread 2017 Competition.  Closing date for entries is Friday,12th May 2017.  There are prizes, Rosettes and Trophies for the winner  in each section.

 

THE ALL IRELAND HOME COOK CHAMPION 2017 QUALIFIER

Clonakilty Agricultural Show are delighted to announce that their show on Sunday, 11th June 2017 will be one of the venues for the live amateur cooking competition “The All Ireland Home Cook Champion “2017.

The Competition will be run in association with the Irish Countrywoman’s Association (ICA). Competitors can apply through their local ICA Guild, through their local regional agricultural show or the following websites www.ica.iewww.irishshows.org or www.chefadrian.ie.

After an evaluation process finalists will then cook off live at one of six national shows, 5 regional finals and The All Ireland Final.  The Competition tag line is “Creativity with Irish Ingredients”   The competition will be run alongside cooking demonstrations by TV3 and RTE chef Adrian Martin (Chef Adrian). The cooking demonstrations and live cooking competition will take place alongside an artisan food village.  Ingredients for the live cook offs will be revealed to the competitors 10 days before each regional final.

The prizes for the All Ireland Finalists this year are as follows

Winner €1000

Second €500

Third, Fourth, Fifth, and sixth €200

Competition entrants must be

  • 18 or over as of 1st May 2017.  
  • You cannot have acquired any third level or other professional catering qualifications in the last 10 years.  
  • You cannot have worked full-time as a chef in a restaurant.  
  • All contestants must be amateur cooks. If you have previous professional kitchen experience that the organisers deem (in their entire discretion) could create an unfair advantage you may not be eligible.  
  • You must be available to participate in the regional final and the All Ireland final cook off (if chosen), see dates and locations of shows close to you. Final cook-off, All Ireland Final will take place at Iverk Show, Co. Kilkenny Saturday 26th August 2017.  

 Each entry must consist of

  • A completed application form which includes one full recipe including step-by-step instruction as to how the dish is cooked.  
  • Entries must be submitted 10 days before each regional final.  

Recipe Criteria

  • Entrants must use local produce (all Irish ingredients).  
  • All recipes should demonstrate creative use of ingredients.  
  • Preparation and cooking time for the dish must be completed within one hour (this will be applicable also in the regional finals and The All Ireland Final).  

For further queries please email johnmartinevent@gmail.com or Tel: 0035387 2681635

For further details contact John Martin of Martin Event Management on 0872681635 or email johnmartinevent@gmail.com.

“PUT A STOP TO BULLYING” – Show

“PUT A STOP TO BULLYING” – THEATRE CHARACTERS FROM WEXFORD STUDIO PUTTING ON A SHOW WITH THIS THEME AT CLONAKILTY AGRICULTURAL SHOW ON SUNDAY, 11th JUNE

Clonakilty Agricultural Show are delighted to announce a very special theatre performance form Wexford Studio and Athenaeum Theatre and Museum in Enniscorthy and the interesting storyline may have a lesson for all of us.  This theatre production will be staged at Clonakilty Show on Sunday, 11th June.

The name of the show is “Jeff and Elvis”  and is a wonderful celebration of storytelling.  This exciting production is packed full of adventure and fun, uses songs, puppets, masks, and comedy to tell the story of how a bully changes his ways and finds happiness through love and friendship.

Anyone can be bullied – it isn’t restricted by age, race, gender, religion or sexuality. It can happen anywhere, from the classroom be it pupil to pupil to teacher and pupil, or the sports field to the home, online or in the workplace.

Many people who experience bullying hide it, like it’s something to be ashamed of, but they are not to blame, the bullies are!  Just remember the bully has no rights to violate your human rights and make you feel worthless.

To the bullies of the world, there must be someone you care about, a parent, a sibling a friend or a child, you imagine someone making them feel in-significant, unwanted, afraid and alone.  Bullying shows weakness, not power, regardless of life experiences.  “Sticks and stones’ line is rubbish, words do hurt and do scar!  Now is that really what you, the bully, want to hold your legacy for in life?

The sad part of bullying is that there is a bystander who witnesses bullying when it happens.  They often become an assistant, may join in the bullying or by their silence alone re-enforces the bullying.  If you are aware that bullying is taking place and don’t do anything about it then, you are just as much to blame.

If you are a bully, then stop and think, would I like someone to treat me this way?  If you are being bullied then don’t let them win.

Unfortunately, most cases of bullying goes nowhere, often happening in institutions where people have permanent jobs and cannot leave because of the security.  Often time, the leadership in these organisations are very weak.

If someone is bullied, they deserve some action to be taken by management.  You can have all the policies in the world, but if leadership is weak, bullying will prevail.  Not good enough to say, it must be put in paper before any action can be taken and even then professional loyalty will prevail..

The show lasts for one hour, in a special theatre tent, which is very attractive in itself  and can accommodate up to 40 per show.  Well worth catching up with at Clonakilty Agricultural Show on Sunday, 11th June.

 

LETS JIVE! LIKE OUR MOTHER AND FATHER DID

Young people from all over Ireland have turned their back on the disco lights of the nightclubs, don their stetsons and are jiving to the music that their mother and father danced to, many moons ago.

A host of new country stars like Nathan Carter,Derek Ryan and of course Paul Kelly who plays at this year’s Clonakilty Agricultural Show on Sunday, 11th June, to name but a few have tempted a new generation back to the dance floor and are taking the music of the 50s and especially the jive to new heights.

Dance classes all over Ireland are jammed packed as couples try to outdo each other, adding new moves and grooves, that it is almost becoming a competitive sport on the dance floor.

To capture this new craze on the dance floor, how appropriate that Clonakilty Agricultural Show have embarked on a Country Theme and Jiving Competition for their annual show on Sunday 11th June, especially as proprietor of the very popular dance hall back in the 50 and 60s. know as the Industrial Hall – “the dancing mecca of West Cork, where love stories began” and is still going strong with the very popular youth disco “The Boiler”.

“Bringing a little bit of Country to Town is this year Clonakilty Agricultural show theme on Sunday, 11th June and topping the entertainment  bill is Paul Kelly & Band, recently announced Sunday Worlds New Comer to Country Music.  To add to this great line up of entertainment is Paddy O’Brien will be guest artist on the day.

Clonakilty Agricultural show are also featuring an “Open Mic” to give upcoming musicians to showcase their talent.  If you are a budding musician and want to make a break, then contact the organisers of Clonakilty Agricultural Show for a slot in their Open Mic Show.  Ceoltais in Clonakilty amongst other have already showed an interest.